Tag Archives: Rachel Bright

Book Reviews: February 2016 Picture Book Roundup

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9780374346904Love Monster and the Last Chocolate by Rachel Bright. Farrar, Straus, Giroux-Macmillan, 2015. First published 2014.  Intended audience: Ages 2-4, Grades PreK-K.

A sequel to Love Monster and less problematic I think than its predecessor, in this story Love Monster finds a box of chocolates on his doorstep upon returning home. He wants to eat the chocolate but realizes that he should share the chocolate. But if he shares the chocolate there may not be enough. His friends may take the piece of chocolate that he really wants. Ultimately, Love Monster decides to share and to confess his selfish thoughts to his friends—who laugh and explain that they left the chocolate; they ate all but one piece, which they wanted to save and share with him, and if he’d opened the box, he’d have seen the chocolate and the note saying that they had missed him.  Readers are reminded that honesty and generosity reward and that friendship and chocolate are better when shared.  The gut-wrenching guilt that Love Monster experiences over his selfish desires seems maybe a bit condemning but that guilt is not thrust on Love Monster; it is rather a byproduct of his own conscience, which for me makes the book less condemnable.

****

9780670013272Llama Llama Nighty-Night by Anna Dewdney. Viking-Penguin Random, 2012. Intended audience: Ages 0-3.

This simple board book takes Llama Llama through the routine of getting ready for bed with the same catchy rhymes and endearing illustrations that are used in the picture books for older children. The cardboard pages, shorter length, shorter sentences, and simpler ideas all show that Dewdney understands the younger audience as well as she can captivate kids just a little older. Llama Llama is one of my favorite modern series, so this book might get some extra brownie points for including one of my favorite characters. Dewdney is a powerful illustrator and good writer.

****

please-open-this-book-9781442450714_hrPlease, Open This Book! by Adam Lehrhaupt and illustrated by Matthew Forsythe.  Paula Wiseman-Simon & Schuster, 2015.  Intended audience: Ages 4-8, Grades PreK-3.

I feel like I’ve been reading—and loving—a lot of books that break down the barriers between the characters and the reader, the fictional world and the real. In this one, the characters are relieved that someone has finally opened their book because the last person to read it closed the book with them still inside, injuring several of them. The characters complain about their lot, all the while trying to convince the current reader never to close the book, even bribing the reader. I am of two minds about this book: I can see the argument that this book will leave kids wracked with guilt about closing another book ever again, which will lead to a mess of open books on tables and on the floor. On the other hand, I giggled at its silliness and read it at a story time, and it is one of the only books that I have ever sold because of a story time to someone who was at that story time. The mother who was there thought that her child—the older one who was not present, but I suspect was a young elementary age child—would love it, and bought it out of my hand when I’d finished reading. So, really, if parents are okay with this book, I don’t see why I should worry about it.

****

407429The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales by Jon Scieszka and illustrated by Lane Smith. Scholastic, 1992. Intended audience: Ages 5-8, Grades K-3.

This book is nearly as old as I am and has been in my possession for probably nigh twenty years now. It’s still funny. These extremely fractured fairy tales are narrated by Jack of “and the Beanstalk” fame and interrupted often by a very frustrated little red hen. Many of these stories lack the magic and the change that comes at the end of most fairy tales: The ugly duckling just becomes an ugly duck; the frog prince is just a frog lying about a curse; the stinky cheese man is chased by no one. The morals of the fairy tales are lost too. But it’s in the unexpectedness and refusal to adhere to the trope or tale type that these tales succeed. There is quite a bit of fourth wall breakage too: on the back cover, the hen complains, “Who is this ISBN guy?”; the giant wants to tell his story and does so in a hodgepodge of sentences cut and pasted from other tales; Jack accidentally tells the whole of “Little Red Running Shorts” in his introduction and Red and the wolf walk out on him, refusing to tell it again. The hen is my favorite character, but my favorite stories are “Chicken Licken” and “Jack’s Story.”  The mixed media illustrations often work in close tandem with the text, making this more picture book than picture storybook.

*****

24968109What Pet Should I Get? by Dr. Seuss. Random, 2015.

This is the first of Dr. Seuss’ posthumous books that I’ve read, and I really enjoyed it. It started out seeming a little too ordinary for what I expect from Seuss and a bit slow for that, the siblings debating between a puppy, a kitten, a goldfish, but it did devolve into the ridiculous and imaginative animals that are wonderfully Seussian (and yes, that is a word, in the Oxford Dictionary and all). The whole plot revolves around a brother and sister needing to choose just one pet, for which their father will pay. In the end, they decide on the perfect pet—but Seuss never tells us which pet that is—which I loved. This will never be a favorite Seuss book of mine—not with the mess of wonderful books of his out there, but this was lighthearted, nostalgic, silly fun.

****

576a1851142468e1c25a977f2dfa976fRaven’s Light: A Myth from the People of the Northwest Coast by Susan Hand Shetterly and illustrated by Robert Shetterly. Atheneum-Macmillan, 1991.

This is an old book of my roommate’s from which the dust jacket is missing and the binding on the pages has come undone, so I don’t actually know what the cover looks like. The cover that I found is someone’s Pinterest pin off of an image that has now been removed from Amazon, though it looks like the right style certainly, and I wanted to give you some idea of the illustrations. I am not familiar with this myth outside of the book. In this story, the raven flies over a dark, landless, unpopulated sea with a heavy sack and a pebble. The pebble when he drops it into the sea becomes land and from the sack he pulls out all of the creatures including people. A tear in the sky attracts his attention. Through that tear is the bright land of the sun. Raven turns himself into a leaf and is ingested by the beautiful daughter of a chieftain there. He is born again as her winged humanoid child. He grows up among the people there, protected by his mother. Eventually he steals the sun from the chieftain, his grandfather, and brings it to his own dark kingdom. A young girl accepts his gift and releases the moon and sun.

I am always interested to learn new myths so I enjoyed this story, and I enjoy knowing about these books to share with others who are interested. This story is different from most that I’ve heard too, most of which seem to involve humanoid gods/creators, usually either pitted against one another or in amorous relations with one another (sometimes both), who consciously or accidentally create land and create life but never because they are tired and overcome.  I’m familiar with the raven as a trickster in some American folklore and as a symbol of death and ruin in Anglo-Celtic folklore and mythology, but this I think is the first I’ve seen of a raven god/creator.

Susan Shetterly doesn’t explain so much as she reports. The text is colorful and descriptive with powerful words. Susan Shetterly relies on that and on the characters themselves more than she does on an authoritative narrator. Myths for adults can often be too bogged down by scholarly articles and footnotes. Myths for kids can be too pedagogic or too anxious about not undermining the storytellers’ own beliefs. This telling nicely avoids both types of heavy-handedness, and really comes together as a story.

****

9781627794046Hedgehugs by Steve Wilson and illustrated by Lucy Tapper. Henry, Holt-Macmillan, 2015. First published 2014.

This is a precious friendship story about two hedgehogs who just want to express their love for one another in the fashion of humans—with a hug. But hedgehogs are spiky, and hugs between them are uncomfortable. They try several types of seasonable armor to protect each other from their spikes (providing a teaching opportunity about the weather changes and seasons), but none is successful until they find a few socks fallen from the laundry, which when donned protect them from each other’s quills and look absolutely adorable besides. This book also claims an explanation for all those socks that seem to go missing in the wash.  Really, it’s just adorable.

****

These reviews are not endorsed by any of the authors or publishers or anyone else involved in the making of these books.  They are independent, honest reviews by a reader.

Book Reviews: February Picture Book Roundup

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Elf on the Shelf: A Birthday Tradition by Carol V. Aebersold and Chanda A. Bell and illustrated by Coe Steinwart.  CCA and B, 2013.

This is a sequel to The Elf on the Shelf, which I reviewed in November’s roundup, and again I read this book at a story hour event.  This was a much more fun story hour event—though admittedly, it’s possible it was more fun because I’ve had more practice with story hours since.  Like The Elf on the Shelf, this book is used to explain a toy more than as a standalone book.  The book explains the elves’ birthday traditions and how a child’s elf can with Santa’s help return to the child’s home for the child’s birthday.  The elf will decorate a birthday chair for his or her child and watch the events.  The elf’s purpose here is more celebratory than policing and that is a welcome relief from the inherent creepiness of the elf on the shelf’s concept.  I thought overall that this was a better book than The Elf on the Shelf, but it was still nothing stellar.  I wonder how many children would actually be excited to see their elves some time other than the Christmas season, even donning a costume to look like a cupcake and so distancing themselves from the Christmas season and their regular role as police.  I just don’t understand this tradition.

**1/2

Love Monster by Rachel Bright.  Farrar, Straus and Giroux-MacMillan, 2012.  Intended audience: Ages 2-4, Grades Pre-K-K.

This follows the outcast Love Monster, who does not feel as cute and cuddly as the other residents of Cutesville and is not as loved as the other residents of his town.  Love Monster searches all over but only really finds someone with whom he can be comfortable when he has given up hope and ceased to look.  The text and illustrations are clever and bright as the author’s name.  Others’ reviews have talked about the ill-ease that the readers feel at the moral that Love Monster cannot be loved or find love with others who do not share his peculiarity, but that same moral reminds me of the quote by Dr. Seuss:  “We are all a little weird and life’s a little weird, and when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours, we join up with them and fall in mutual weirdness and call it love,” and since I feel that that particular quote very aptly sums up my friendships, I don’t mind the idea as a premise for a children’s book.

****

Forget-Me-Not: Friendship Blossoms by Michael Broad.  Sterling, 2011.

Too small, too big, too young, Forget-Me-Not the Elephant is rejected from the groups of friends already gathered together at the watering hole where his herd arrives.  Rejected, he finds himself beneath the bare trees, where he meets Cherry the Giraffe.  As the days pass by, the trees grow and change as do Cherry and Forget-Me-Not.  When the spring comes and pink blossoms cover cherry trees beneath which Cherry and Forget-Me-Not meet, the animals that had originally rejected Forget-Me-Not come to him to enjoy the cherry blossoms, but Forget-Me-Not has learned the meaning of true friendship and though he does not reject the others as they once rejected him, he cleaves to Cherry.  This is a sweet story of friendship with beautiful illustrations.  It is a sequel to Broad’s Forget-Me-Not, which I’ve not read.

****

Does a Kangaroo Have a Mother, Too? by Eric Carle.  HarperCollins, 2002.  First published 2000.  Intended audience: Ages 4-8.

I’m realizing that Eric Carle as much, as I remember him as this brilliant storyteller, writes bestiaries more than he writes stories.  A child could learn the names of many animals from him, but there’s just not much story there.  This one is particularly devoid of plot, having no real protagonist (unless it be the speaker).  The book ends with reminding the child of the mother’s love.

**1/2

Small Bunny’s Blue Blanket by Tatyana Feeney.  Knopf-Random, 2013.  Intended audience: Ages 2-5.

This story reminded me a particular person in my family who will remain unnamed to protect her identity—and myself from a shotgun and a shovel.  Small Bunny does everything with Blue Blanket, Small Bunny needs Blue Blanket, and Blue Blanket helps Small Bunny to do everything he does better.  But all that attention has made Blue Blanket dirty, and Small Bunny’s mother finally takes Blue Blanket away to be washed, promising that Blue Blanket will be a good as new when it is returned to Small Bunny.  When Blue Blanket comes back, however, it doesn’t smell or feel like it did, so Small Bunny has to use Blue Blanket as he used to do till Blue Blanket becomes the same dirty blanket that he loved.  It’s a sweet story.  The drawings are simple in style and color, very enjoyable, and surprisingly expressive for being so simple.  I think it’s probably important that there are books like this that say that the security object is okay and promise that that the object will not be hurt by a washing, but there are already a great number of these stories, and I don’t think that Feeney’s ranks among the most memorable.

***

How Do You Hug a Porcupine? by Laurie Isop and illustrated by Gwen Millward.  Simon & Schuster, 2011.  Intended audience: Ages 4-8.

I read this too for a story hour book, and I’m glad that it was there on the table displaying books for Valentine’s Day because it avoided romantic or familial hugs and kisses, which I would rather leave to families to read to one another while I read something more platonic.  I liked the build of how to hug different animals before getting to the promised porcupine (though I was a bit displeased that no one wanted to hug the skunk; doesn’t the skunk want hugs?).  I liked the different ways in which the protagonist tried to make the porcupine more huggable because some of them (particularly covering each spine with a cushioning marshmallow) made me laugh, though I am glad that he needed none of these techniques, that the porcupine did not need to be altered in any way to be hugged.  It’s an enjoyable little book.  I wish I had gotten a copy in my cereal box.  I will have to look for last year’s winner in April 2015’s boxes.

****

The Kiss That Missed by David Melling.  Barron’s Educational, 2007.  First published 2002.  Intended audience: Ages 4-7.

I loved this book.  A preoccupied king, too busy with his own concerns, blows a kiss towards his son as he passes the door, but the goodnight kiss misses and is blown out the window.  A clumsy knight is summoned to follow and retrieve the kiss.  The knight must pass through many perils, but the kiss that he pursues subdues the wild beasts just as they are about to attack the knight.  The bright, expressive illustrations add humor to the already humorous text.  The king learns his lesson about taking time out of his schedule for his son, which is wonderfully encouraging and I think is as good a lesson for parents as it is a promise to the children.  It plays with the fairytale clichés creatively and well.  There’s a great deal of tension between pages—something actually rather difficult to achieve with picture books, but the monsters were painted so ferociously and the danger came so near that as I was reading I felt my heart patter a bit faster.  Without much text, characters are given a rather great deal of personality.  This is one I want to add to my library.

*****

Best Friends Pretend by Linda Leopold Strauss and illustrated by Lynn M. Munsinger.  Cartwheel-Scholastic, 2014.

This was a request from one of my visitors to the story hour.  The cover led me to believe that there would be more glitter and more shine, and first let me say that the absence of these between the covers was a letdown.  The rhyming text takes the two girls through a number of professions and roles that they pretend to take on.  I suppose I am glad that the roles portrayed are gender neutral and end with a “women can have it all” feminism, and I am also thankful for the interracial friendship, but I was not wowed by either the text or the illustrations.

***

Wherever You Are: My Love Will Find You by Nancy Tillman.  Feiwel & Friends-Macmillan, 2012.  First published by 2010.  Intended audience: Ages 4-8, Grades Pre-K-3.

I was prepared to hate this book for its mushy-gushy ickiness, but maybe because my extended family had recently welcomed a new baby into its midst, I loved it.  The message is such a sweet one, and you can tell from the covers of any of her books that Tillman is a singularly gifted artist.  These are inspiring words to share with children of any age, and the rhyme and rhythm make me suspect that they are words that might easily sink into a subconscious to be recalled when they are needed.

*****

Penguin in Love by Salina Yoon.  Walker-Penguin, 2013.  Intended audience: Ages 3-5.

In January’s roundup, I reviewed the book that kickstarted this series: Penguin and Pinecone.  I loved Penguin and Pinecone.  I was a little bit less enthused about this sequel, possibly because it ditched the message of friendship in favor of a romantic storyline that really is not ideal for the audience to which this picture book claims to cater (which, yes, I recognize many of the films for kids of this same age do, but Disney gets something of a buy for having started with fairy tale retellings).  Also, here the paraphernalia of knitting is a bit too prominent.  It feels forced, forced into the plot and superseding the plot to the detriment of the plot.  In the first book, knitting is a background theme, a way to show the passage of time, and a plot device; here it is more than that, too much.

**1/2