August 6: Evening in Dublin

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Click on the photos to embiggen and to read captions where available.

This trip began with a long wait, and then a lot of dashing.

When delays on my first flight, supposed to be just a quick hop from the local airport to a larger, international hub, caused me to miss my original flight to Dublin, the American Airlines representative at the airport was admittedly very quick to find me the next possible flight, which had me in Dublin the same day, but later in the afternoon rather than the early morning.

 

I did not land in Dublin itself to nearer 4:00 PM. Getting into the city, my sister and I dashed to Trinity College. When she had left me to do most of the planning for our stay in Ireland, I had asked her what bucket list items she had to check off in the country. I had none—or had only one that I learned was a scant possibility too late to plan. (I wanted to visit the island where Luke Skywalker hides himself in this newest trilogy, but never dreamed that island was in as accessible a country as Ireland. Next time I’ll have to find my way to Skellig Michael; this time it was not possible to squeeze in. And I did not want to cross the border into Northern Ireland, just to keep things as simple as possible, but I would too one day like to see Giant’s Causeway.) Seeing the Old Library of Trinity College was one of those things.

Trying to figure out the bus system proved confusing for both of us, tired as we were from a day on planes and in airports. We’d found a manned booth outside of the airport’s exit. We overheard one of the employees giving directions to a less expensive bus into the city, and we first sought out that stand, but then couldn’t quite figure out the machines to know what ticket to buy. So we returned to the manned booth, and bought the ticket for the waiting bus.

We arrived at Trinity College with only maybe twenty minutes to the exhibit’s close (heads up: it and practically every other museum close at 5:00 PM), paid our €14 entrance fee, and fairly ran through the exhibit on the Book of Kells. The information on the maze of walls was undoubtedly interesting, but we peered at the items in display cases without much time for reading. There was a case explaining how the monks achieved some of the vibrant colors on their manuscripts, then a case with four open books, two of which were sections of the famed Book of Kells and two of which were books of similar age. The Book of Kells was written around the beginning of the 9th century, the Garland of Howth was written around the 8th or 9th century, and the Ricemarch Psalter c. 1079. The detail and the color and the preservation of the books was itself pretty stunning, but what really stole my breath was the Old Library: two stories of bookcases in niches, clearly a library in use with tomes tilted where books were missing and a few books laid haphazardly on top of others. Busts lined the hall between the shelves, first of important figures of literature and science and philosophy, but later names we did not as readily recognize, local figures maybe or figures of importance to the college itself. We’d looked before leaving for the trip for ways to get into the Old Library bypassing the Book of Kells exhibit and the €14 entrance fee, but we hadn’t been able to find any way to do so without either making friends with a student or having a legitimate reason and approved letter for permission to study within the library; we had time for neither.

 

As the Library was closing, we next wandered the grounds of the college. We were trying to find the psychology building, but never did. My sister had at one point looked at going to Trinity College herself, so she had wanted to see what she might have had, where she might have lived. It is a large, beautiful campus, and looking at a map now to see where was the psychology building, I think we didn’t stumble into maybe but a third of it.  It feels a bit like a city unto itself, with its own park and its own back alleys and streets, buildings old and ivy-covered and new.  My sister and I both attended more rural undergrad universities, and I think both of us had prettier campuses.  I didn’t spy any water feature on this campus–not the part that we made it to; she had a large duck pond and waterfall into a river on her campus, and we had a number of creeks and a much smaller pond.  We both had more grass.

 

We meandered a bit on our way to our dorm, and stopped to duck our heads into Christchurch and the entrance to Dublinia when we passed it and to explore the area around Dublin Castle. Maybe someone can explain to me: In both we saw red, yellow, blue, and green used side by side. Being me, I recognize the four Hogwarts House colors pretty quickly, but why were they used together in Dublin?

 

 

We stayed at a place in an area known as the Liberties. When we’d gotten into a friendly conversation with a man in a shop, and he asked where we were staying, he was appalled by that answer. Though the dorm was farther out from the city than was necessarily ideal, it seemed safe enough—after we had found it, and knew our way. Finding it was a problem. I had to pull out my Maps app to get us there. A paper map didn’t do us enough good; streets are not marked as clearly I feel in the UK as they are in the US—or perhaps I don’t know where to look for street signs. Too, there was construction not far from the dorm—on the next building across the street. Perhaps the trouble was more that he lived North of the Liffey, and we were staying far to the South; he was not alone in mentioning that there was loyalty to North or South Dublin among their residents.

The dorm itself, Destiny Student – New Mill, which I think is used during the school year especially as student housing, was really quite nice, with a lot of shelves around the desk and around the bed. The bed had padding on both sides that were against the wall, and there was a cushioned bench at the end as well as a comfortable desk chair. The window was most of the fourth wall of the room and overlooked the courtyard and facing buildings. There were doubled blinds, which made the room plenty dark to sleep in at night. There was a locked gate. And the help desk was open 24-hours, so that we needed to check out quite early was no problem. By booking the room through the website, I was able to get a free towel for us, and we were given soap and shampoo as well. The bedding was included, two comfortable pillows, clean sheets, and a white duvet.

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A view from our dorm room of the courtyard

It was directly across from the Dublin Liberties Distillery. The distillery itself was not yet completed and not open to the public when we were there. The general manager says that he has plans to make it so.

For now at least, the area was quiet, away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Even the construction didn’t disturb my sleep.

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About Kathryn

My love of books has been carefully cultivated by the adults who raised me and also by the friends who love to share. My life has led me down long library shelves, to online forums, fanfiction sites, the front of a lecture hall, and into the desks of college classrooms. With an English degree and a couple master’s classes in Children’s Literature, I am now a bookseller for Barnes & Noble. I have been an editor for Wizarding Life Networks (the people who brought you Wizarding Life, Panem October, and MyHogwarts now HogwartsIsHere).

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