People of Color in the Books I Read in 2017: Part 1: Picture Books

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I read 68 books that included people of color this year, which sounds impressive compared to last year’s 44, but that is only 27% of the total books that I read this year. However, of those 68, 34 had a person of color as a protagonist—a full HALF, 14% more than last year! But again, those 34 are only 14% of all of the books that I read this year.

Did those numbers go up from last year? Yes, yes they did, but not by enough, never by enough. The percentage of books that I read with any mention of people of color increased by only 1%, but the percentage of books with people of color as protagonists rose by a full 9%.

This year’s books are listed roughly in descending order of their average rating on Goodreads.

Picture Books, Picture Storybooks, and Board Books (Ages 0-8)

Books with a POC as a protagonist

Marvelous Cornelius: Hurricane Katrina and the Spirit of New Orleans by Phil Bildner illustrated by John Parra. Chronicle, 2015. An African American man, a trash collector, based on a real man from New Orleans, is depicted as heroic for his unbreakable spirit and his infectious enthusiasm.

Hello Lamb by Jane Cabrera. Little Bee-Simon & Schuster, 2017. Protagonist may be a stretch, but only one human baby is represented, and she is represented with darker skin. She shares the stage with animals.

The Dragon Prince: A Chinese Beauty and the Beast Tale by Laurence Yep and illustrated by Kam Mak. HarperCollins, 1997. Every character in this tale is Chinese.

Green Pants by Kenneth Kraegel. Candlewick, 2017. The whole cast of this sweet tale about independence and making decisions and compromise are of African descent.

Round by Joyce Sidman and illustrated by Taeeun Yoo. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017. The characters appear to be of Asian descent.

Goodnight Lab: A Scientific Parody by Chris Ferrie. Jabberwocky-Sourcebooks, 2017. A young, female scientist of African descent closes up her lab while harried to publish by a grumpy, old, white man.

Cinnamon by Neil Gaiman and illustrated by Divya Srinivasan. HarperCollins, 2017. The illustrations draw heavily on Indian tradition and the story seems to be set in India.

Rulers of the Playground by Joseph Kuefler. Balzer + Bray-HarperCollins, 2017. An African American girl, Lennox, competes with a white boy, Jonah, for dominion over a playground populated by a diverse collection of children. Augustine, a white girl with red hair, emerges as their rival after the dust of their dispute has settled.

If You Ever Want to Bring a Circus to the Library, Don’t! by Elise Parsley. Little, Brown-Hachette, 2017. Magnolia appears Asian, probably Chinese. The story time crowd at the library is diverse, but the librarian is male and white.

A New Friend for Sparkle by Amy Young. Farrar, Straus and Giroux-Macmillan, 2017. Lucy, a young, African American girl learns to share her new friend, a white boy, Cole, with her pet unicorn.

A Night Out with Mama by Quvenzhané Wallis and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton. Simon & Schuster, 2017. This is a story written by and about Wallis. She and her family are all African American.

A diverse cast with no protagonist

Blue Sky White Stars by Sarvinder Naberhaus and illustrated by Kadir Nelson. When humans are depicted, the crowd is wonderfully diverse, people of many different backgrounds represented, including women in hijabs, African Americans, a Native American woman, Asian Americans, and Latinx Americans, but this is a celebration of America more than anything else, America is the protagonist.  Kadir Nelson is an amazing realist painter.

Baby’s Big World: Music by Rob Delgaudio and illustrated by Hilli Kushnir. BoriBoricha, 2017.  In this exploration of music for toddlers, the cast is diverse, and an African American girl is featured on the cover.

Do Not Take Your Dragon to Dinner by Julie Gassman and illustrated by Andy Elkerton. Picture Window-Capstone, 2017. Diverse children, including a young hijabi, lament and then school their dragon friends in table manners, though ultimately the story resolves mostly around a white family. 

Skin Again by bell hooks and illustrated by Chris aschka. Jump at the Sun-Hyperion-Disney, 2004.  This picture book celebrates self-love and love for others and encourages looking beyond outward appearance.

When Dads Don’t Grow Up by Marjorie Blain Parker and illustrated by R. W. Alley. Dial-Penguin Random, 2012. Dads from a four families are celebrated.  One family appears African American.  Another may be Chinese.  And maybe Latinx?

It Takes a Village by Hillary Rodham Clinton and illustrated by Marla Frazee. Paula Wiseman-Simon & Schuster, 2017. A community comes together to create a playground.  White, African American, and Asian American community members seem to be represented.

How Do Dinosaurs Choose Their Pets? by Jane Yolen and illustrated by Mark Teague. Blue Sky-Scholastic, 2016. Different families struggle to correctly school the dinosaurs in their family in choosing and caring for a pet.  One dino mom seems to be African American… but hers is the dinosaur absconding with a tiger from the zoo.  The mothers at the end with the well-behaved dinos are both white, and I’m not best pleased about that.

Why Am I Me? by Paige Britt and illustrated by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls. Scholastic, 2017. An African American boy begins the book by wondering why he is himself and not someone else, the refrain quickly echoed by a white girl. The city is wonderfully diversely populated by people of many backgrounds, including hijabis, African Americans in more than one shade of brown, Asian Americans, several biracial couples–there even seems to be the silhouette of a woman in a burka and her son in a long tunic, but no one really emerges as a protagonist, per se.

Begin Smart: What Does Baby Say by Sterling Publishing, 2016.  This is a first words primer featuring different babies in the illustrations.

Animal or nonhuman protagonist with a secondary character who is a POC with a speaking role

School’s First Day of School by Adam Rex and illustrated by Christian Robinson. Roaring Brook-Macmillan, 2016. The school is the protagonist, but his first and best friend is an African American man, a janitor in the school.  The school children are diverse: African Americans (in the kindergarten class, Chloe and Max), Asian Americans (Bella), Latinx Americans (one of the Aidens), perhaps even the teach is a Latina?  The school is named after Frederick Douglass.

Curious George: Dinosaur Tracks by CGTV based on characters by H. A. Rey. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2011. Curious George’s African American friend, Bill, a teenage or elementary school boy, is both the cause of the mystery and the one to answer George’s questions.

A white protagonist with a secondary character who is POC with a speaking role

Beauty and the Beast adapted by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Meg Park. Hyperion-Disney, 2017. The beast when he becomes a prince is darker-skinned than is Beauty, of African or Spanish origin?

Animal or nonhuman protagonist with diverse background characters

The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson. Puffin-Penguin Random, 1977. First published 1936. Ferdinand the bull is the protagonist, but every human character is Spanish. This is perhaps not the best portrayal of Spanish culture; while bull-fighting is in fact a part of Spanish culture, it is a violent sport, and there is no discussion of the human characters regretting the violence, only fearing the supposed violence of the bulls.

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat. Little, Brown-Hachette, 2014. The secondary character is a young, white girl, but the other children playing with other imaginary characters and the cityfolk are diverse.

The Legend of Spookley the Square Pumpkin by Joe Troiano and illustrated by Susan Banta. Barnes & Noble, 2009. First published 2001. This may a story about appreciating one’s differences, but the story is about pumpkins, the farmer is white, but his patrons are diverse.

Trains Don’t Sleep by Andria Warmflash Rosenbaum and illustrated by Deirdre Gill. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017. This is a story about trains, really without any protagonist even, more about factual trains, the types of trains and their functions, but the travelers and those the trains pass are diverse, mostly African American or white.

White protagonists with diverse background characters

Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts. Abrams, 2013. 

Iggy Peck, Architect by Andrea Beaty and illustrated by David Roberts. Abrams, 2007.

Miss Nelson is Missing! by Harry Allard and illustrated by James Marshall. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2003. First published 1977.

Sarabella’s Thinking Cap by Judy Schachner. Dial-Penguin Random, 2017. 

How to Get Your Teacher Ready by Jean Reagan and illustrated by Lee Wildish. Alfred A. Knopf-Penguin Random, 2017.

It’s interesting—and sad—to note that in all these diversely populated classrooms, not one of the teachers is a person of color.

Fancy Nancy by Jane O’Connor and illustrated by Robin Preiss Glasser. HarperCollins, 2005. Nancy’s family visits a restaurant where an African American family are also eating.

Are We There Yet? by Dan Santat. Little, Brown-Hachette, 2016. One of the pirates at least is darker skinned than the others and than the protagonists.

Dad and the Dinosaur by Gennifer Choldenko and illustrated by Dan Santat. G. P. Putnam & Son’s-Penguin Random, 2017. One of the soccer players is darker skinned than the protagonists or other children.

 

Do you know or think that I misrepresented or misinterpreted any of these?  Please comment below.  Let me know.

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About Kathryn

My love of books has been carefully cultivated by the adults who raised me and also by the friends who love to share. My life has led me down long library shelves, to online forums, fanfiction sites, the front of a lecture hall, and into the desks of college classrooms. With an English degree and a couple master’s classes in Children’s Literature, I am now a bookseller for Barnes & Noble. I have been an editor for Wizarding Life Networks (the people who brought you Wizarding Life, Panem October, and MyHogwarts now HogwartsIsHere).

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