Book Reviews: October 2014 Picture Book Roundup

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The Very Busy Spider’s Favorite Words by Eric Carle. Grosset & Dunlap-Penguin, 2007. Intended audience: Ages 6-8.

I’d forgotten when I picked this book up this October that I’d already read the book back in January 2013. But since that review has never made it to this site, here is what I wrote then for Goodreads:

I liked this book even less than The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s Favorite Words. There was no pairing of nouns such as there was in The Very Hungry Caterpillar. The only real delight in this series is Eric Carle’s illustrations, but those are even more delightful when paired with a background rather than being an isolated figure. Other than that, I can praise their small size, just right for a young toddler’s hands.

Re-reading this book this October, I think maybe that first review was a tiny bit harsh. I still can’t color myself impressed, but I did enjoy the colors of Carle’s illustrations, and I was not so… offended.

Still, it does seem that this book’s purpose is to capitalize on Carle’s commercial success.

*

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Mini Myths: Be Patient, Pandora! by Joan Holub and illustrated by Leslie Patricelli. Appleseed-Abrams, 2014.

Last month I read and then praised Play Nice, Hercules!, a Mini Myths book written by the same team. I expected to like Be Patient, Pandora! I won’t again go into the credentials of the team, which are excellent. Be Patient, Pandora! like Play Nice, Hercules! retells the myth in a modern setting and with a similar but more commonplace situation for a toddler audience and then includes in the back a summary of the myth for a slightly more mature audience.

Holub and Patricelli’s tale tells of a young Pandora who finds a wrapped present on the floor, which her mother forbids her to open. Like many children, Pandora bends the rules. Her anticipation of the present too great to leave the box alone, she pokes it, jumps on it, and unintentionally destroys the packaging and what the box contains: cupcakes, which is a very interesting substitution for all of the evils of the world. My Classics professor introduced us to the argument among scholars as regards the Hope (elpis) that remained in Pandora’s jar. Holub and Patricelli probably wisely don’t engage in whether the Hope is a blessing or a blight, loosed or withheld but Pandora does say that she hopes that her mother still loves her, a nod to the Hope that remained in the jar.

*****

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An Elephant and Piggie Book: My New Friend Is So Fun! by Mo Willems. Hyperion-Disney, 2014. Intended audience: Ages 6-8.

I was actually able to recommend this book as a response to a similar situation with which a young customer was struggling—and that I consider a high praise for a book. If a book is enjoyable, that is one thing. If a parent believes that a book might teach an important social lesson, that’s quite another.

Piggie has met Brian, and Elephant Gerald and Brian’s best friend, Snake, worry over whether Piggie and Brian will become such good friends that Gerald and Snake will be replaced. Told in Willems usual and wonderful style, Gerald and Snake go to check up on Piggie and Brian who are indeed having great fun together and, as if anticipating their friends’ worry, tell them that have even gone so far as to make best friend drawings. The drawings turn out to be of Gerald and Snake, and Gerald’s and Snake’s fears are assuaged. The moral here is that its possible to have more than one good friend.

****

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