Book Review: The Demigod Files Restores My Love of Riordan

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For whatever reason, maybe even just because it has been so long since I’ve partaken of a book by Rick Riordan, whom I have called both my current favorite author and the next J. K. Rowling, I enjoyed The Demigod Files far more than I did the similar, later The Demigod Diaries, by which I felt sadly let down if not betrayed.  The Demigod Files’ stories happen between books four and five of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, a climactic time for the series.  Percy Jackson was my introduction to Rick Riordan, and it has always been my favorite of his three series.  Perhaps that’s another reason why I should prefer The Demigod Files to the Demigod Diaries, which corresponds to the sequel series, The Heroes of Olympus.

Like The Demigod Diaries, The Demigod Files consists of three short stories by Rick Riordan alongside interviews with several key characters and a few easy puzzles.  Also included are illustrations of some of the characters and a useful chart of the Greek gods, their domains, their sacred animals, and symbols.

All three of these short stories, unlike those of The Demigod Diaries, are written from the point-of-view of Percy Jackson, who perhaps at least partially because of his familiarity and Riordan’s ease in his voice, is one of my favorite of the many voices that I have seen Riordan capture.

In these stories Riordan expands several key side characters, especially Silena Beauregard.  By the end of Percy Jackson and the Olympians and the beginning The Heroes of Olympus, Silena is regarded in a better light by campers at Camp Half-Blood than I have ever regarded her, and the campers regard for her has always thrown me.  She almost needs the bolstering from “Percy Jackson and the Bronze Dragon.”  I will be interested to reread either The Last Olympian or The Lost Hero to see if I can be more sympathetic towards her now that I have a better grasp of her character.

The others with whom Percy interacts in these tales—Clarisse La Rue, Charles Beckendorf, Nico di Angelo, and Thalia Grace—I feel are fairly well understood through the Percy Jackson series alone.  I did not need to learn more about them in these short stories, as I needed to learn more about Silena, but I was glad to spend time with them and to share in their adventures.

Riordan is a master of adventure stories.  In all of these, the demigods face monsters, deadlines, and impossible odds (the usual trials of a Riordan book).  Riordan also tempers all of the dread with his usual humor, a somewhat dry humor, I suppose, that relies a lot on a tone and sarcasm that does not match the situation.  These stories are scattered with such lines as “A girl starts trying to kill you, you know she’s into you” (35), “One dragon can ruin your whole day” (33), and “It’s great when you’re a celebrity to squids” (22).  Out of context none of those have made me laugh, but when paired with the imminent danger in which the demigod finds himself, these nuggets of humor are so unexpected that they do wonders to lighten the tone without killing it.  That balance of humor and peril takes talent.

*****

Riordan, Rick.  Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Demigod Files.  New York: Hyperion-Disney, 2009.

This review is not endorsed by Hyperion Books, Disney Book Group, or Rick Riordan.  It is an independent, honest review by a reader.

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